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Are you, or is someone you care for, dealing with a life-limiting illness?
Hospice Mid-Canterbury is here to help and support you.

Hospice Mid-Canterbury provides support for those with a life-limiting illness, their family and their caregivers. All services are free and are available throughout the Ashburton district between the Rakaia and Rangitata Rivers.
We do not provide clinical care, but complement existing services by providing support such as transport, sitting, recording life stories, counselling, massage, Reiki, and reflexology.
Hospice Mid Canterbury is a registered Charitable Trust and an Associate Member of Hospice New Zealand.
Our goal is to help people make the most of their lives; to live every moment in whatever way is important to them.

Hospice Mid-Canterbury – Here when you need us.

Our Core Services

We provide a number of services to support people dealing with a life limiting illness.
Support is also available to families and carers.
All our services are free.

Biography Writing

Resources

Home Support

Massage

Reiki

Reflexology

Companionship

Counselling

You matter because you are you, and you matter to the end of your life. We will do all we can not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.

Dame Cicely Saunders,
founder of the modern hospice movement 1918 – 2005

Hospice Mid Canterbury
Community House
44 Cass Street, Ashburton
Phone 03 307 8387
Mobile 027 227 8387

manager@hospicemc.nz

Facebook Posts

'Communication and Dementia' - useful tips.
As part of our regular education programme for volunteers and service providers, Philippa Cosgrove, an educator from Dementia Canterbury, gave us some useful tips on communicating with people who have dementia.
Philippa encouraged us to remember the 4 S's:
Slow
Simple
Specific
Show

Slow: Slow everything down. It takes time for a person with dementia to process information. Walk slowly, talk slowly and allow plenty of time for the person to respond. Communicate as if you have all the time in the world.

Simple: Keep things simple without being patronising or condescending. Use simple, clear words.

Specific: Be specific in your language. e.g. "Put your cup on the table", rather than "Put it over there" (use nouns rather than pronouns). Avoid idiomatic language like "jump in the car". And avoid asking open-ended questions like "what do you want to do now?" Try giving a choice, e.g. "Would you like to do a puzzle, or would you like to go for a walk?" By asking questions with a clear choice, you make it easier for them to manage. Everyone wants to appear competent and able, and those with dementia are no different.
Invite conversation without putting the person on the spot to find an accurate answer, e.g. "look at those lovely faces in the photo", rather than "Who is that?"

Show: Think about how you can communicate without words. e.g. when you are asking them to have a shower, use a combination of cues such as giving them the towel, showing them the direction to go, have the shower running etc.

Think about lighting - often rooms are too dim which can be another barrier to understanding what is happening.
Many people with dementia don't realise that they might have a problem, for example with glare, and others have to keep an eye out to make sure they are comfortable.
Make sure the person can hear. Check hearing aides are in, and minimise distractions.
Consider the environment the person is sitting in, for example the regulation of temperature.
Bring the sensory world in to the person - spring flowers, autumn leaves, music - so they can remember with their senses.
Your face and body language communicate much more than you realise.

It is really important to avoid arguing, correcting, interrupting and reminding the person that they're forgetting things.

Focus on the well-being of the person and how they are feeling.

What matters is the engagement you had with the person at the time. The person will remember how they felt when they were with you.
... See MoreSee Less

Communication and Dementia - useful tips.
As part of our regular education programme for volunteers and service providers, Philippa Cosgrove, an educator from Dementia Canterbury, gave us some useful tips on communicating with people who have dementia.
Philippa encouraged us to remember the 4 Ss:
Slow
Simple
Specific
Show

Slow:  Slow everything down.  It takes time for a person with dementia to process information.  Walk slowly, talk slowly and allow plenty of time for the person to respond.  Communicate as if you have all the time in the world.

Simple:  Keep things simple without being patronising or condescending.  Use simple, clear words.

Specific:  Be specific in your language.  e.g. Put your cup on the table, rather than Put it over there (use nouns rather than pronouns).  Avoid idiomatic language like jump in the car.  And avoid asking open-ended questions like what do you want to do now?  Try giving a choice, e.g. Would you like to do a puzzle, or would you like to go for a walk?  By asking questions with a clear choice, you make it easier for them to manage.  Everyone wants to appear competent and able, and those with dementia are no different.
Invite conversation without putting the person on the spot to find an accurate answer, e.g. look at those lovely faces in the photo, rather than Who is that?

Show:  Think about how you can communicate without words.  e.g. when you are asking them to have a shower, use a combination of cues such as giving them the towel, showing them the direction to go, have the shower running etc.  

Think about lighting - often rooms are too dim which can be another barrier to understanding what is happening.
Many people with dementia dont realise that they might have a problem, for example with glare, and others have to keep an eye out to make sure they are comfortable.
Make sure the person can hear.  Check hearing aides are in, and minimise distractions.
Consider the environment the person is sitting in, for example the regulation of temperature.
Bring the sensory world in to the person - spring flowers, autumn leaves, music - so they can remember with their senses.  
Your face and body language communicate much more than you realise.

It is really important to avoid arguing, correcting, interrupting and reminding the person that theyre forgetting things.

Focus on the well-being of the person and how they are feeling.

What matters is the engagement you had with the person at the time.  The person will remember how they felt when they were with you.

 

Comment on Facebook

That's brilliant advice and well worth remembering in this situation for all of us. Have an awesome day Hospice Mid Canterbury.

Interesting reading Carole,Lynne, David

Thanks Rose 😊

That's great info very helpful

Great advice. Steve have a read.

Hi Carole, hope your all well.

We have an amazing Hospice here in Mid Canterbury . Tutorials for the Volunteers

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2 weeks ago

Hospice Mid Canterbury

This is beautiful ...That's what I want to say ... ... See MoreSee Less

This is beautiful ...

 

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful

Really nice

2 weeks ago

Hospice Mid Canterbury

INFOGRAPHIC: Coping strategies for sundowning and sleep issues (Alzheimer's Association) ... See MoreSee Less

We are very grateful to the Community Organisation Grants Scheme (COGS), for a grant of $5000 which will go towards our operational costs. Thank you! 😊 ... See MoreSee Less

We are very grateful to the Community Organisation Grants Scheme (COGS), for a grant of $5000 which will go towards our operational costs.  Thank you! 😊
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Bradford Group
Principal Supporters
of Hospice Mid Canterbury

Hospice Mid Canterbury

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